ICYMI: Health Fair set for Tuesday, Job Fair set for Thursday

The Lee College campus will be abuzz this week with two annual events that regularly draw hundreds of community members and dozens of local businesses: the Health Fair on Tuesday, March 24, and the Take Command of Your Career Job Fair on Thursday, March 26.

Health Fair

When: 1- 4 p.m.
Where: Sports Arena

Details:  At least 50 local vendors – including pharmacies, medical facilities, vision and dental offices and fitness centers, among others – will be on hand to showcase their services and offer advice about living a healthier and more fit life. In addition to being screened for blood pressure, body fat percentage, vision, dental and even chiropractic evaluation, Health Fair guests will also be able to collect free handouts and tokens to take home.

Take Command of Your Career Job Fair

When: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Where: Sports Arena

Details: Job seekers are advised to come to the fair dressed and ready to meet with potential employers hiring candidates for positions in several fields: computer maintenance and technology; instrumentation; process technology; computer-aided drafting; art and design; office administration; healthcare; broadcasting; banking; engineering; construction; safety; general contracting; welding; pipefitting; civil service; law enforcement; human resources; and education.

The Center for Workforce and Community Development will host a speed-networking event from 11 a.m.-noon to give participants the opportunity to get feedback on their resumes and interview skills.

Staff members from various Lee College departments will also be available to offer information about degree and certificate programs, financial aid options and tips for students applying to and attending college for the first time.

Comments Off

Women’s History Month event Tuesday to feature art, student presentation

Did you know that March is officially Women’s History Month in America? Join International Education this Tuesday, March 24, for a celebration honoring generations of women whose contributions and commitment to positive change have enriched and improved our world.

The Women’s History Month event will be held from 2-4 p.m., at the Student Government Fine Arts Lobby inside the McNulty-Haddick Complex. There will be an art exhibit, student presentations, refreshments and more.

Comments Off

Mexican-American Studies program welcomes activists from Houston assembly

When 43 students from the College of Ayotzinapa in Mexico mysteriously disappeared with little explanation or attempts by authorities to solve the case, activists from the Asamblea Popular de Houston (APH) vowed to raise awareness — and a recent visit with Mexican-American Studies students at Lee College was another step in their fight for justice.

“It’s something that has affected Mexicans, but it has also affected all of us around the world,” said Fernanda Villalpando, a member of the assembly who spoke to students as part of a special Mexican-American Studies class centered on social justice and open to the community.

The trouble began in September 2014, when students from Ayotzinapa commandeered a fleet of buses and vans to travel from rural Guerrero to the city center, where they planned a protest of government policies. As the students’  convoy pulled into the town of Iguala, local police there opened fire  — killing six people and wounding dozens.

Forty-three of the Ayotzinapa students were then rounded up by police and have not been seen or heard from in the 6 months that have followed. Mexican authorities have since attributed their disappearance to drug cartels, whom they say killed them all.

But the parents of the missing students — and their supporters like APH, which organized a week-long “Caravana” throughout Houston to draw attention to the case  — are not convinced. They believe the students were taken because they were actively working against efforts to allow multi-national corporations to set up shop in Guerrero, which has long been home to people who make their living off the resources provided by the land.

“We are not happy with the response of the government because this was a state crime,” Villalpando said. “The drug cartel has been an excuse to squash social justice. There’s been a history of repression of social movements, particularly with indigenous people. ”

Being part of the assembly and sharing the stories of the missing students and their families is a way for just one person to potentially impact thousands, the activists told the Mexican-American studies class. Don’t be afraid to stand up and speak out against injustice and oppression — your voice matters and can make a difference, they said.

“We’re talking about a very corrupt government, and the case of Ayotzinapa brings the question of how far up the corruption goes,” said APH member Marixa Andrade. “Forty-three students is a lot, and the fact that they were poor, the fact that were trying to better themselves, makes it even harder to swallow. We won’t stop until we bring them home.”

Comments Off

Rebel Rousing: Faculty achievement & Phi Theta Kappa inductees

Instructor invited to speak at University of Pennsylvania symposium

David Ensminger, folklorist and instructor in English and Humanities and author of numerous books and articles on punk culture, was invited to speak at the Punk Symposium sponsored by University of Pennsylvania and the Africa Center on March 22 in Philadelphia.

He served on a panel entitled “Punkademia?” which explored punk culture from numerous angles.

Congratulations, David! We know you wowed the crowd at UPenn! 

Phi Theta Kappa inducts new members

The Zeta Nu chapter of the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, located at Lee College, recently inducted 80 new members. Phi Theta Kappa serves to recognize and encourage the academic achievement of students of 2-year colleges and programs. Those inducted:

Miguel Aguilar
Paige Barnett
Danyel Browder
John Brown
James Bryan
Micah Bullard
Rebecca Bush
Jacqueline Butler
Sean Clark
Jordan Clements
Brandon Cooper
Casey Courson
Erin Cravey
Doramaria Crespo Baide
Jared Dangazo
Allison Deese
Sean Dickey
Juan Donan
Keisha Duggan
Grant Duke
Celeste Escamilla
Dianie Fontenelle
Kyle Fry
Joshua Goin
Daisy Gonzalez
Daniel Grabill
Jessi Graham
Kenya Guajardo
Alfredo Guerrero
Hunter Hargrave
Bernard Harvey
Wesley Hearn
Bryce Holt
Leslie Jones
Dakota Joseph
Stacy Joseph
Akarshan Khatri
Rhonda Lancon
Michael Lara
Harley Lewis
Tiffany Lewis
Esmeralda Licea
Eric Lopez
Marie Lopez
Christina Magana
Jesus Martinez
Tyrone Massicot
Kristilyn Mathews
Mercedes Mercer Taylor
Candice Moore
Jesus Negrete
Justin Nelson
La Michael Newsome
Jeremy Otahal
Nat Paengpongsavanh
Joe Perez
Ashnell Polimis
Ariel Reeves
Amanda Richards
Kimberly Rodriguez
Landon Rowland
Kathleen Salanguit
Jeremiah Salinas
Jesus Sandoval
Gilbert Sandoval
Jose Silvestre Acuna
Jodie Simelda
Forrestt Smith
Parker Speer
Avione Street
Jack Summers
Christen Symmons
Robert Talley
Marissa Tarango
Victor Tejeda
Abel Trejo
Alejandro Velez
Ashley Wilson
Jonathan Woodward
Catherine Young

Dr. Donnetta Suchon, vice president of Student Affairs, was also inducted into Phi Theta Kappa as an honorary member of the Zeta Nu chapter.

Congratulations to all for your accomplishment!

Comments Off

Weekly Wellness from Jason Summers

6 Amazing Seeds With Incredible Health Benefits

By John Summerly

Health experts around the world recommend people incorporate these 6 seeds in their diets. Whether you sprinkle these over your breakfast cereal or have them as a health boosting snack, you can’t go wrong with seeds.

1) CHIA SEEDS

Serving Size = 1 Tsp

Consider these facts about Chia seeds:
– 2.5 times more protein than kidney beans
– 3 times the antioxidant strength of blueberries
– 3 times more iron than spinach
– 6 times more calcium than milk
– 7 times more vitamin C than oranges
– 8 times more omega-3 than salmon
– 10 times more fiber than rice
– 15 times more magnesium than broccoli

The seeds are loaded with vitamins and minerals, are an excellent source of fiber, protein and antioxidants, and are the richest plant source of omega-3 fatty acids. Consumption of chia seeds could help reduce joint pain, aid in weight loss, deliver an energy boost and protect against serious ailments such as diabetes and heart disease.
The seeds are gluten-free, which also makes them appealing to people with celiac disease or an aversion to gluten.

Chia seeds reduce the risk of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Studies have proven that their consistent use lowers blood pressure. They are recommended to dieters since they give the feeling of being full, so you are less likely to overeat.

2) FLAX SEEDS

Serving Size = 1-2 Tsp (ground)

Dietary fiber from flaxseed suppresses rises in blood levels of lipids after a meal and modulate appetite.

University of Copenhagen researchers report that flax fiber suppresses appetite and helps support weight loss.

Flax has been cultivated for centuries and has been celebrated for its usefulness all over the world. Hippocrates wrote about using flax for the relief of abdominal pains, and the French Emperor Charlemagne favored flax seed so much that he passed laws requiring its consumption!

The main health benefits of flax seed are due to its rich content of Alpha-Linolenic Acid (ALA), dietary fiber, and lignans.

The essential fatty acid ALA is a powerful anti-inflammatory, decreasing the production of agents that promote inflammation and lowering blood levels of C-Reactive Protein (CRP), a biomarker of inflammation. Through the actions of the ALA and lignans, flax has been shown to block tumor growth in animals and may help reduce cancer risk in humans.

Flaxseed combats free radicals and improves digestive and cardiovascular health.

3) PUMPKIN SEEDS

Serving Size = 1/2 Cup

They are the only seed that is alkaline-forming in this world of highly acidic diets.

Add pumpkin seeds to your list of foods rich in protein. 100 grams of seeds on a daily basis provide 54 percent of the daily requirement in terms of protein.

Most of us pop pills to replenish deficiency of vitamin B-complex, try pumpkin seeds next time. Pumpkin seeds are a good source for vitamin B like thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, vitamin B-6 and folates.

For those who are down in the dumps, pumpkin seeds can help fight through depression. The chemical component L-tryptophan is the secret ingredient to boost your mood.

Did you know that pumpkin seeds can prevent kidney stones? Studies suggest that pumpkin seeds can help prevent certain kidney stone formations like calcium oxalate kidney stone.

Pumpkin seeds even hold the secret to fighting parasites, especially tapeworms. They boost immunity, and regulate insulin levels.

4) SESAME SEEDS

Serving Size = 1/4 Cup

Sesame seeds may be the oldest condiment known to man. They are highly valued for their oil which is exceptionally resistant to rancidity.

Not only are sesame seeds a very good source of manganese and copper, but they are also a good source of calcium, magnesium, iron, phosphorus, vitamin B1, zinc and dietary fiber. In addition to these important nutrients, sesame seeds contain two unique substances: sesamin and sesamolin. Both of these substances belong to a group of special beneficial fibers called lignans, and have been shown to have a cholesterol-lowering effect in humans, and to prevent high blood pressure and increase vitamin E supplies in animals. Sesamin has also been found to protect the liver from oxidative damage. Studies show they may also reduce risk of multiple sclerosis.

5) SUNFLOWER SEEDS

Serving Size = 1/4 Cup

Sunflower seeds are an excellent source of vitamin E, the body’s primary fat-soluble antioxidant. Vitamin E travels throughout the body neutralizing free radicals that would otherwise damage fat-containing structures and molecules, such as cell membranes, brain cells, and cholesterol.

Sesame seeds have some of the highest total phytosterol content of seeds. Phytosterols are compounds found in plants that have a chemical structure very similar to cholesterol, and when present in the diet in sufficient amounts, are believed to reduce blood levels of cholesterol, enhance the immune response and decrease risk of certain cancers.

Sunflower seeds are a good source of magnesium. Numerous studies have demonstrated that magnesium helps reduce the severity of asthma, lower high blood pressure, and prevent migraine headaches, as well as reducing the risk of heart attack and stroke.

6) HEMP SEEDS

Serving Size = 1 Tbsp

More people are discovering the nutritional benefits of hemp seed, nut and oil. Hemp contains:

– All 20 amino acids, including the 9 essential amino acids (EAAs) our bodies cannot produce.
– A high protein percentage of the simple proteins that strengthen immunity and fend off toxins.
– Eating hemp seeds in any form could aid, if not heal, people suffering from immune deficiency diseases. This conclusion is supported by the fact that hemp seed has been used to treat nutritional deficiencies brought on by tuberculosis, a severe nutrition blocking disease that causes the body to waste away.3
– Nature’s highest botanical source of essential fatty acid, with more essential fatty acid than flax or any other nut or seed oil.
– A perfect 3:1 ratio of Omega-6 Linoleic Acid and Omega-3 Linolenic Acid — for cardiovascular health and general strengthening of the immune system.
– A superior vegetarian source of protein considered easily digestible.
– A rich source of phytonutrients, the disease-protective element of plants with benefits protecting your immunity, bloodstream, tissues, cells, skin, organs and mitochondria.
– The richest known source of polyunsaturated essential fatty acids.

According to the hemp growers industry, industrial hemp grown for food, fuel and natural fibers contains virtually no THC (less than .3%). In fact, when hemp is processed into hemp seed oil and hemp seed milk, for example, it further reduces the minute amount of THC in hemp. And yet, there’s still a stigma due to the long-standing idea that hemp and marijuana are one in the same. Hemp is actually categorized with marijuana as part of the Controlled Substances Act of 1970 and is therefore illegal to grow in the US.

The best way to insure the body has enough amino acid material to make the globulins is to eat foods high in globulin proteins. Since hemp seed protein is 65% globulin edistin, and also includes quantities of albumin, its protein is readily available in a form quite similar to that found in blood plasma. Eating hemp seeds gives the body all the essential amino acids required to maintain health, and provides the necessary kinds and amounts of amino acids the body needs to make human serum albumin and serum globulins like the immune enhancing gamma globulins. Eating hemp seeds could aid, if not heal, people suffering from immune deficiency diseases. This conclusion is supported by the fact that hemp seed was used to treat nutritional deficiencies brought on by tuberculosis, a severe nutrition blocking disease that causes the body to waste away.

Summerly is a nutritionist, herbologist, and homeopathic practitioner. He is a leader in the natural health community and consults athletes, executives and, most of all, parents of children on the benefits of complementary therapies for health and prevention.

Comments Off

ExxonMobil commits another $500K to community college petrochemical training program

ExxonMobil Chemical Co., recently announced that it will donate an additional $500,000 to the Community College Petrochemical Initiative (CCPI), a joint effort between Lee College and eight other Texas Gulf Coast community colleges to attract, train and place workers into open positions in the petrochemical industry.

The latest gift brings ExxonMobil’s total contribution to CCPI to $1.5 million. Matt Aguiar, senior vice president of ExxonMobil Chemical Co., made the announcement at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo, where CCPI is sponsoring a booth for the second year in a row.

“We expect new industry investment to attract thousands of jobs to the Houston area as our industry capitalizes on the abundant, affordable supplies of US natural gas to produce chemicals,” Aguiar said in a news release. “The community colleges are preparing area residents to fill these new jobs and launch satisfying careers in the petrochemical industry.”

It was also announced at the rodeo that CCPI will be known as EnergizeHouston in its joint venture with UpSkill Houston, a regional workforce initiative launched by the Greater Houston Partnership in 2014.

“EnergizeHouston is an incredible, innovative first step toward solving our petrochemical and construction shortage, but this challenge is far bigger than what one company can solve,” said Bob Harvey, President and CEO of the Greater Houston Partnership.

“This combination adds an already strong and functioning job and training platform to UpSkill Houston, and allows us to greatly increase our ability to attract, train and place skilled workers in the seven industry sectors critical to our future: advanced manufacturing, industrial and commercial construction, health care, oil and gas, petrochemical, ports and maritime, and utilities.”

Comments Off

Annual Lee College health fair, job fair events set for next week

Representatives from dozens of local companies will be on campus next week to network with job-seekers at the Take Command of Your Career Job Fair, and to offer wellness advice and free screenings to the community at the free Health Fair.

Health Fair
1-4 p.m., Tuesday, March 24
Sports Arena

The Health Fair will be held from 1-4 p.m. in the Sports Arena. At least 50 local vendors – including pharmacies, medical facilities, vision and dental offices and fitness centers, among others – will be on hand to showcase their services and offer advice about living a healthier and more fit life.

“The Lee College Health Fair is a special event because it provides our employees, students, and community members a free, low-stress, no-strings-attached opportunity to get some valuable information and feedback that people can immediately plug into their daily routine to help them on their wellness journey,” said Jason Summers, wellness coordinator for the college and fair organizer.

In addition to being screened for blood pressure, body fat percentage, vision, dental and even chiropractic evaluation, Health Fair guests will also be able to collect free handouts and tokens to take home. Bringing local businesses together to help the Baytown region become a healthier place shows how much Lee College is invested in the community it serves, Summers said.

“Lee College is committed to helping move our entire community in a positive direction,” he said. “I hope that everyone that can attend the Health Fair, will attend. You will not be disappointed with the quality of service and information that you walk away with.”

For more information about the 7th annual Health Fair, contact Summers at 281.425.6439 or jsummers@lee.edu.

Take Command of Your Career Job Fair
10 a.m.-2 p.m., Thursday, March 26
Sports Arena

Sponsored by the Student Career and Employment Office, the job fair is set for 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Thursday, March 26, in the Sports Arena. The Center for Workforce and Community Development will host a speed-networking event from 11 a.m.-noon to give participants the opportunity to get feedback on their resumes and interview skills within a supportive environment.

Job seekers are advised to come to the fair dressed and ready to meet with potential employers hiring candidates for positions in several fields: computer maintenance and technology; instrumentation; process technology; computer-aided drafting; art and design; office administration; healthcare; broadcasting; banking; engineering; construction; safety; general contracting; welding; pipefitting; civil service; law enforcement; human resources; and education.

Staff members from various Lee College departments will also be available to offer information about degree and certificate programs, financial aid options and tips for students applying to and attending college for the first time.

“Our annual job fair is an amazing tool and resource for students, alumni and the community to network with companies who want to invest in their future,” said Lena Yepez, student Career and employment technician. “Representatives will be available to answer questions and guide them to Lee College degree paths that will assist them in securing the career they are seeking.”

For more information about the upcoming Take Command of Your Career Job Fair, click here or contact the Student Career and Employment Office at 281.425.6572.

Comments Off

LC enters new collaboration agreement with Legacy Community Health

Thanks to a new collaboration with Legacy Community Health, the entire Lee College community now has one less hurdle to jump when it comes to finding affordable healthcare for themselves and their families.

Under the collaboration agreement, Legacy will offer a wide variety of services to faculty, staff and students who want or need them: educational programs and presentations each semester about various healthcare topics and their rights and options as patients; tours of the Legacy facility by appointment; and resources related to immunizations and vaccinations, including specially scheduled blocks of time for students to see the immunization nurse. Legacy will also help students with referrals for service, and maintain ongoing and open communication about how access and service delivery can be improved.

The partnership originally began as an effort to help students in the Project Leeway program, according to counselor and program coordinator Kewana Davis. The program, funded through a federal grant, assists low-income adults in pursuing a college education.

“When students are sick, what often happens is that they end up missing school. Sometimes it impacts the family so much that they eventually drop out all together,” said Davis, who has seen many  students who do not have access to healthcare, or any idea of how to go about seeing a doctor.

“This partnership with Legacy will help us to help them,” she said, citing research studies that show having a clinic on campus or close affiliations with local healthcare providers can improve student learning outcomes and assist in the educational experience. “It will alleviate the stress of not knowing what to do if something were to happen. They’ll have a plan, and to have a plan is to be successful.”

In Baytown, Legacy offers family practice and adult primary care, OB/GYN and maternity care, and pediatrics and geriatrics. The company also offers a range of behavioral health services, including therapy, counseling, psychiatry, psychology, and education support groups for autism, PTSD and substance abuse.

“Legacy’s services and programs are open to all who need us, regardless of the ability to pay, without judgment or exception,” said community manager Terri Boyko, noting the company’s mission to drive healthy change in its communities. “We partner with other organizations to bridge the gap in healthcare and create healthy communities.”

Comments Off

The Texas Tenors play to sold-out crowd at PAC concert

For the second straight year, The Texas Tenors performed in front of a sold-out crowd at the Performing Arts Center — delighting fans with old standards like “God Bless the USA” and “Music of the Night,” and presenting new arrangements of favorite songs from the trio’s diverse repertoire.

“Thank you Baytown Symphony Orchestra and Lee College,” the group wrote on their Facebook page after the show. “SOLDOUT! See you in 2016!”

Known for their country roots and classical sound, The Texas Tenors are “three friends with a dream” who have showcased their unique vocal talents, lush harmonies and special brand of humor in more than 800 concerts around the world since making it to the final rounds of the television competition show, “America’s Got Talent” in 2009. The group covers everything from Alabama to Puccini, with Broadway and contemporary music also in the mix.

Comments Off

Rebel Rousing: Spring Fling & Dress for Success

Spring Fling – March 4, 2015

Dress for Success – March 4, 2015 

       

Comments Off